From Hampshire (College) With Love

“If you don’t go to Creative Arts Team, I’ll kill you.”

That’s what my professor told me after I announced that CAT was one of the five places I would be interviewing at for my spring semester field study. Coming from one of the warmest and most nurturing people I have ever known, I knew she meant it.

Sigal-with-studentsI am currently a junior at Hampshire College in Amherst, MA  (or a Division II student in Hampshire vocabulary), studying arts integration and specializing in theatre as a teaching tool. As a young person who struggled with the traditional educational system, I found myself through the arts. I am passionate about using the arts to teach and learn, experiencing first hand how the arts can change lives.

I stumbled upon Creative Arts Team while researching field study opportunities. I knew I wanted to be in New York City and have hands-on experience working with young people doing theatre. I reached out to many organizations and, by some amazing stroke of luck, found myself at CAT.

Here at CAT I mainly work with the Adolescent Literacy Program (ALP). I work five days a week. I am either in the office assisting on projects, or in Brooklyn with Actor Teacher Katherine Chua, supporting her and the students’ work in every way I possibly can. I don’t know if I have ever worked with a group of youth as open and welcoming as the ALP students are. The idea of joining a community halfway through the year was a bit intimidating, but it was a challenge that I was obviously more than thrilled to take on.  I received a few goodbye hugs at the end of the first day, and I left knowing that all I had to do was be the best self I could be, and that would be enough. The openness displayed by the young people powerfully attests to the positivity and beautiful mentorship of the actor teachers (Kat, Andre, and Brisa).

Sigal-with-students2If I have learned one thing from my two months at CAT and working with ADL, it’s that this work is HARD. During one of my conversations with Kat she told me, “Despite the long hours I work, I have never felt so rewarded.” This work is exhausting. It’s about being on your feet for many hours and opening up your heart. It’s about the process. And it’s about allowing these young people to realize and practice all of their amazing abilities.

Ultimately the work is all about giving. And I can’t thank Creative Arts Team and the ALP team enough for giving me this incredible opportunity to join them in doing their beautiful work.

SigalSigal Kadden
Student, Hampshire College

2014 Intern, CAT
Early Learning/Adolescent Literacy Program

From the Front Lines of the Festival

I’ve been participating in the NYC Student Shakespeare Festival since 2004, and I look forward to this phenomenal program every year! My students feel the same way - they can’t wait until our school’s drama club is offered, so we can delve into Shakespeare’s plays and make them our own.

 

InfoTech 2014 NYCSSF Scene

Info Tech’s 2014 scene: Inner angels & demons get involved with a murderous plot, taken from a mixture of Julius Caesar, Macbeth & Othello.

Once our drama club is formed in January, we begin by engaging in theater activities - much of what I learned in the professional development days provided by CAT. Then we explore genres and themes that pique my students’ interests, ranging from murder mystery, teenage love, betrayal and parent-child relationships. My students are given opportunity to take ownership - from choosing the central question which will guide the Shakespearean piece, to adding their own interpretations of characters, to choosing costumes and stage directions. They also love having professional teaching artists from CAT come to our school and guide them in developing their theatrical skills and preparing them for the big showcase at an off-Broadway theater, the esteemed Lucille Lortel Theater.

InfoTech2013

Info Tech’s 2013 scene: A Zombie Hamlet!

Of course, my analysis of their experience doesn’t do it justice. Here are two of my students’ reviews:

“I have loved acting ever since I was about the age of 7. Shakespeare’s stories are incredible; my favorite play was Romeo and Juliet due to the fact that I can imagine it. Acting just makes me feel free, especially if it’s from an author like Shakespeare. The Shakespeare Festival made me open my eyes more to it. I like meeting new people and learning how to get better at acting, so I joined the Festival and will join again next year.” -Gustavo

“I keep doing the Shakespeare Festival because it’s fun. It allows me to meet new people. I can go up on stage, perform what I’ve worked so hard on and be proud of it. It also boosts my confidence.” -Demetri

Heather Conn (center) at an NYCSSF professional development workshop in 2008.

Heather Conn (center) at an NYCSSF professional development workshop in 2008.

Heather Conn
Teacher
Information Technology High School
NYC Student Shakespeare Festival Participant since 2004

Note from CAT: Heather Conn is not an employee of CAT, but an annual participant in our NYC Student Shakespeare Festival – we are grateful for her (and her students’) kind words here as well as her fabulous Festival participation!

CAT, CATT, KAT, ALP, ELP, ELA & “B”-yond

Acronym is the name of this game.

CAT = Creative Arts Team
CAT was the first acronym I was introduced to as I was plunged into the world of ‘Educational Theatre’ in October 2013. I am a CUNY Service Corps member, who was placed at CAT to learn from Actor Teachers and their commitment to public service. The CUNY Service Corps is an organization dedicated to giving undergraduates an opportunity to work at sites in NYC that are positively impacting the community.

A day at CAT: Rolling like dice into a room with grown adults acting like twelve-year-olds, never knowing what to expect or what would happen next. It was a perplexing experience. Suddenly, I felt like the adult in the room, which is ironic since I am the youngest. Being the newbie, I was convinced that I was being hoodwinked. After 45 minutes of making random sounds, creating tableaux and playing name games, I finally realized I was plopped into the middle of an Actor Teacher rehearsal session.

CAT is unlike any other NYC office environment. In the midst of a bitter NYC winter, the CAT office is filled with the warmest atmosphere. Everyone is friendly, energetic, and sarcastic; most importantly everyone loves their job and is passionate about their contribution to the community.

CATT = Community Action Theatre Troupe
KAT = Katherine, Actor Teacher
CATT’s pride leader Kat, alias Katherine Chua, welcomed me into the pride lands of educational theatre at the after-school program in Brooklyn. A cat learning how to swim is analogous to my first days at CATT.  Now, you call me a “catfish” because I finally understand how tongue twisters, name games, and playing detective is related to learning and education. Tongue twisters help students with their pronunciation and enunciation skills, name games help enhance their memory and improvisation helps them think on-the-fly, which is useful when taking a multiple choice exam.

Melissa-ALPMelissa (center) with ALP students

ALP = Adolescent Literacy Program
ELP = Early Learning Program
ELA = English Language Arts
ELL = English Language Learner
“B”KY = Brooklyn YMCAIS 347/IS 349
“B”ECA = Bronx Early College Academy
Like a tidal wave the acronyms started crashing in around me; it’s a good thing cats have nine lives. Gasping for air I began to see beyond the pride lands of BKY and its twin at BECA. ALP and ELP are the larger programs at CAT focused on engaging students throughout NYC in interactive drama strategies that help ELLs enhance their ELA skills.

Most importantly, beyond the acronyms, are all of the students who are breaking out of their shells and expressing themselves through theatre techniques, and the tireless Actor Teachers, who take on the CATT challenge with alacrity.

Melissa-Rambavan

Melissa Rambaran
CAT Adolescent Literacy Program Assistant
CUNY Service Corps Member
Queens College ’14

See You at the Show…

Coming from a musical theatre background, I’m quite used to what happens during production week of a show. Long days and nights at the theatre, bringing together all of the elements of the show that have been worked on in separate corners, seeing everyone in costume for the first time, and the excitement (and some nerves!) going from the dress rehearsal to the first performance. Though it’s always a jam-packed time, it’s also very exciting to see everything come together into a full-fledged production.

As the CAT Youth Theatre begins production week for IN TRUTH, the excitement is more palpable than ever, and the process is that much more exhilarating because the show is entirely original, created by the members of the company. The group – 37 young people from all over New York City – has been working together to create an original show examining a range of questions and themes about truth. IN TRUTH will begin performances on February 21st and I can’t wait to share this show with audiences.

I’ve been lucky enough to work with the CAT Youth Theatre for the past two and a half years, working alongside directors from the MA in Applied Theatre, Associate Program Director Kevin Ray, and Program Director Helen White, who founded the Youth Theatre 18 years ago. As Program Manager, I’m very proud that, 18 years later, the program is still free for the young people, and that there are no auditions – just a commitment to be an active participant of the CAT Youth Theatre community.  New members are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. The collaborative theatre process gives young people the opportunity to make new meanings from the material of their lives. Members engage in theatre games and exercises, improvisations and scene work, rehearsal, critical reflection, and group discussion. It inspires creativity, builds self-esteem and resiliency, broadens horizons, develops social awareness AND it’s free to the young people who participate. Together, the members create and present original, artistically sophisticated works on topics they consider relevant. It has been a tremendous experience for me to learn more about the world of devised theatre, see Youth Theatre members grow from year to year, and be a part of the consistent production of new work. If you’re interested in creating original theatre, or working with young people, or seeing some exciting new theatre, I’d highly recommend coming to see IN TRUTH.

 

IN TRUTH will be performed at the Baruch Performing Arts Center and the TriBeCa Performing Arts Centers. Public performances begin Friday, February 21st and run through Sunday, March 3rd.  In addition, we will present an afternoon program for school and community youth groups on Tuesday, March 4th. If you work with high school students and are interested in bringing a group to come see a show, please contact the Youth Theatre office at 212.652.2828 or Maureen.Donohue@cuny.edu. See you at the show!

Maureen DonohueMaureen-E-Donohue-(2)
Program Manager
CAT Youth Theatre

____________________________________________________________

CUNY Creative Arts Team • CAT Youth Theatre
IN TRUTH
Spring 2014 Original Production

About the show:

From childhood, we are told to tell the truth, believe certain truths, and be true to ourselves and to each other. But how do we know the truth? Whose truth dominates and how are we misled? IN TRUTH asks audiences to consider their own relationships with truth. Within our families or within our society, what are the stories we are told and those we choose to tell? Why are certain things harder for us to talk honestly about? Through a variety of lenses and themes, the CAT Youth Theatre examines these questions and more in an entertaining and provocative original production.

Performance Schedule:

Performances at Baruch Performing Arts Center:
55 Lexington Avenue at 25th Street, New York, NY 10010
    Friday, February 21st                          7:30pm
    Saturday, February 22nd                   2:30pm & 7:30pm
Sunday, February 23rd                       2:30pm

Performances at BMCC-Tribeca Performing Arts Center
199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007
Friday, February 28th                        7:30pm
Saturday, March 1st                            2:30pm & 7:30pm
Sunday, March 2nd                             2:30pm & 7:30pm
Tuesday, March 4th                           5:00pm*
*Youth Groups Only

Tickets: $15, $10 students and seniors, group discounts available.

Contact the CAT Youth Theatre for more information at
212-652-2828 or maureen.donohue@cuny.edu

Behind the Drama

Behind the Drama

It’s 3:30 pm on a Monday when I walk into a classroom of 12 middle school students.  They don’t see me at first. I just stand and wait in the front of the classroom observing them walk around excitedly telling each other about their day.  One of them notices me and happily yells,“Lexy!”  Soon after, I hear a rippling effect of “Hi, Lexy,” “Yay, Lexy is here!” “Lexy, did you notice my new shirt?”  This is what I live for.

These students don’t really know what I do for their after-school literacy program. They know that I help them get snacks and take field trips; that’s probably why they love me so much!  But what I do is much more complicated.  In order to have a successful after-school program, there are a lot of components and people involved.  We have our program director, actor-teachers, funders, students, and then there is me, the Program Manager.

My job is mostly behind the scenes.  I track a broad range of data, including student’s state exam scores, report card grades, the amount of work submitted, the number of hours per week are students attend the program, and how many students overall are participating – all to ensure CAT is meeting our contract requirements for attendance and academic outcomes for literacy and to understand how the students and our program are progressing throughout the school year.

I take all of this data and make sure to disseminate it to the right people at the right time.  Whether helping actor-teachers incorporate assessment results into developing curriculum objectives or calling a student’s parent to talk about the child’s level of attendance,  I use all of this data to make sure that CAT’s after-school literacy program is running as efficiently and effectively as possible.  It’s very time consuming and detailed work, but I truly love it.   

The greatest part of my job is seeing the impact.  Whenever I visit our students and see them in action, they move me.  Their brilliance, creativity, and excitement for the work that they do gives me hope for this next generation.  And for selfish reasons, it helps me feel fulfilled in knowing that I did my part in helping provide a fun, engaging, after-school program where students are truly learning and growing.

Lexy NisticoLexy-Nistico
Program Manager
Middle Schools Literacy Initiative
Alumni, MA in Applied Theatre

Learning with CHERISH and Breaking Down the HIV Stigma

As an Actor-Teacher with the new educational outreach program, CHERISH (Changing Habits, Environments, & Relationships in Sexual Health), I was blown away by the Greater than AIDS: EMPOWERED video with Alicia Keys. It was not only informative, but was touching and authentic. Like Alicia, I have been working with young women to explore what it means to be empowered and how we can share our own stories in order to break stigmas and inform other young women about HIV/AIDS .  I hope that more women and men watch Alicia’s significant video and use it as a resource for critical conversations about HIV.

I was educated about HIV by our health educator, Briana McGhee, yet I was still surprised by the women’s stories in the EMPOWERED video. It’s one thing to know the facts and another to actually put faces to those facts. This video allowed me to see five beautiful women with hopes and fears just like myself. The truth is that HIV has many different faces. If we break the stigmas and stereotypes by informing ourselves and the people around us, we can “fight the silence”, like the women spoke about.

We have the power to make great change in our communities, including confronting the HIV epidemic here in the U.S. This Sunday, January 19, get your friends and family together at home or online at VH1.com for a #WeAreEMPOWERED watch party, featuring Alicia Keys in conversation with five HIV positive women. Let’s break down ignorance and stigma together. Visit http://greaterthan.org/campaign/empowered/ to learn more!

Marisa-Duchowny-SP-PC

Marisa Duchowny
Actor/Teacher
Project CHANGE, CHERISH

Beyond Entertainment…

Dianna-Garten-picI moved to New York City, a bright eyed 18 year old, entering one of NYU’s acting studios with a single intent: make it to Broadway.  Being an actress was all I had ever dreamed about or hoped for, and all I had ever thought I would be able to do.  I was bolstered by the idea that my talent had gotten me accepted to NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts for acting (the crème de la crème), and convinced that, within a few short years, I would be accepting a Tony or Oscar for my breakthrough performance.

Not surprisingly, things didn’t pan out as I had always imagined.  The number of acting majors at NYU was overwhelming – a small glimpse into the professional audition scene – and the training was emotionally and spiritually brutal.  While I developed many extremely valuable professional skills (many of which I still use), I felt torn to shreds.  Surprised by my unexpected delight in academia, I decided to minor in Jewish History sophomore year.  The more “traditional” theatre work I did, the more I wanted theatre to do more than what was traditional.  A guest speaker, Danny Hoch, came to my acting studio and spoke of his work in prisons and of doing hip-hop theatre.  I felt the inkling for the first time that theatre might be able to do more.  He charged us to take our work out of just the stages of New York into the streets, schools, prisons, and even our hometowns.  As my education went on, I became increasingly eager to find a way for theatre to more than just entertain; I became fixated on political theatre from other countries and wondered at how work like this could be created for my generation.

Six months studying at Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa, changed everything.  I was given a crash course in Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed, and performed for the first time in a play that I helped create from scratch.  During those six months, I saw what I had been longing for in New York: theatre as more than just entertainment.  With two of my classmates, I worked in a middle school for deaf students on the outskirts of the city, and saw how the students eagerly engaged with the theatre work.  I left Johannesburg certain of two things: one, I was on the right track, and two, I had so much more to learn.

After returning to New York and finishing my B.F.A. at NYU, I set out to find somewhere I could learn to do that which I’d glimpsed in South Africa.  I became familiar with the term “applied theatre,” and started to find a whole field of theatrical, community based and educational work I had never known existed.  Through a friend of a friend I stumbled on the Creative Arts Team, and the CUNY SPS MA in Applied Theatre program.   It seemed too good to be true, a program that was focused on academic and practical training for applied theatre right in my own back yard.

I was accepted to the MA in Applied Theatre program in 2012.  The MA program has been a phenomenal resource for me to learn the very rudimentary elements that exist across the field of applied theatre.  It has taken me from an amateur facilitator, just hoping to get it right, to a professional with intentional pedagogy and the skills to both plan and implement educational theatrical experiences.  It has widened my range of skills and challenged me to deeply consider how I approach the work and why I do it.

After just over a year in the MA program, I was hired at CAT to assist with development and reporting.  This has given me insight into the challenges of working in and maintaining this field that is so deeply fueled by passion, and yet not widely understood by funders and other artists.  The combination of my education in the MA program and working at CAT has provided me with vision and confidence to be a professional practitioner in applied theatre, and an advocate for the value of the work across many contexts.

With the support of the MA program and CAT I am more prepared than ever to embark on a career as an applied theatre practitioner.

Dianna Garten
MA in Applied Theatre, Class of 2014
CAT Development Assistant